Suiting Up

isasmile

“Celebrities with Type 1”

“Type 1 Famous People”

“Professional Athletes with Diabetes”

After Isabella’s diagnosis I searched. I searched…and I hoped.  I searched and I found what I had been so sure existed.  And I was relieved. Relieved to know that our daughter had “them” on her side.  She would have “them” to provide the name we needed to trigger some recognition…to trigger some action. I knew that as long as we could count on these people, there was no way Isabella would be living with Type 1 Diabetes ten years from now.

It’s their responsibility, after all…isn’t it?

This morning R&B star Usher announced on the TODAY Show that one of his young sons was diagnosed with T1D this past year .

“This year has been really one of my hardest years – I lost my grandmother, my son was diagnosed as being a type one diabetic. It has definitely been a difficult one for me, man,” he said. 

And with that admission, we scored big. Suit up, Mr. Raymond, and take your place alongside Ray Allen, Nick Jonas, Bret Michaels, Jay Cutler and the handful of others whose families have been turned upside down by a T1D diagnosis. Suit up and get ready for one of the most important gigs of your life.  Suit up and be prepared to be an advocate for…

Your son.

Yes, it’s a bonus for us to have someone like you on our team. Yes, the exposure your son’s diagnosis will give to this disease affecting so many of our families will help us to raise awareness and educate others. Yes, we hope your celebrity status will help us raise funds to aid in our search for a cure.

But that’s not your job right now.

Right now you’re a dad to a son who needs you…more than he’s ever needed you before. And that, my fellow substitute pancreas, is your job.

And when you’re ready, your team is here waiting for you…and we’re all warmed up.

Cheers to Changing the World~
Kristina

 

 

 

Offending ‘Miss Manners’

 

BGCheck

Earlier this week advice columnist Judith Martin, whose Miss Manners column is carried by more than 200 newspapers worldwide, responded to a reader’s question regarding whether or not those with diabetes should check their blood sugar in public settings.  Her response was a column entitled “Do Diabetic Testing in Private” and included the following paragraph:

Absent an emergency, medical applications (like bodily functions and grooming) are properly done out of sight — meaning in private or in a restroom — unless they can be done so surreptitiously as to be unrecognizable as such.

As a father of a child with type 1 diabetes, I felt I needed to respond to her and, after writing, decided my message should be shared publicly with all of you.

——————————–

Dear Miss Manners,

I read your recent response to the gentleman inquiring about testing his blood in public. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, your response shows  ignorance and lack of education about type one diabetes (T1D), as well as a lack of compassion for those living with T1D and their caretakers. As a father of a three and a half year old with T1D, I must say that I was completely appalled by your response.

My daughter, Isabella, was diagnosed with T1D in August 2012, just two weeks before her second birthday. She spent four long days in the hospital after her diagnosis while the doctors pumped her tiny body full of insulin. During that time the doctors and nurses educated us about type one diabetes, an autoimmune disease that we knew nothing about until that moment. We learned that had we not caught some of the symptoms early on, our daughter may have slipped into a coma or worse in a matter or days. We learned that our daughter’s life would never be the same. We also learned that we would have to check her blood glucose levels at least 8-10 times per day, count every carb that she consumes and give her insulin injections at least four times per day.

 This became Isabella’s new “normal” life. What we know, and you likely do not, is that failure to closely monitor her glucose, properly count carbs or administer precise amounts of insulin could ultimately lead to our daughter’s death. Therefore, I view every single moment of every single day (awake and asleep) as an emergency. Our daughter’s life literally depends on frequent blood checks and insulin. We have always checked Isabella’s blood in public and administered insulin injections in public, as well. We have always taught Isabella that T1D is a part of her life and she should never be ashamed or embarrassed about it, nor ever let it define her. And, even at three and a half years old, she has embraced her diabetes, checks her own blood sugar and loves talking about her diabetes with anyone that will listen. We would never suggest that she stop doing any of those things because there is a chance that it might make others uncomfortable.

Isabella now wears an insulin pump that is physically attached to her body at all times. We are often asked about the device, which gives us an opportunity to educate others and raise awareness at the same time. I would never even think about covering it up simply so that no one else can see it (so they don’t become uncomfortable about my daughter’s diabetes, I suppose, according to your logic).

The reality is that Isabella is different than other kids, including her triplet brother and sister….however, we would never make her feel different and ashamed by hurrying her off to the restroom every time we have to check her blood sugar when we’re out in public. We believe it is extremely important that she is completely comfortable talking about her diabetes and the effects it has on her life, physically and emotionally, now at only three and a half years old and as she gets older.

We want Isabella to share her story with the world. As her parents, that’s exactly what we have been doing for the past year and a half and will continue to do so until a cure is found for our daughter and millions of others living with this terrible disease. I can assure you that observing a simple finger prick is nowhere near as uncomfortable as what my daughter and millions of others go through every day of their lives.

Your column only motivates us even more and reminds us that we still have a lot of work to do to educate others and raise awareness.

-Greg Dooley

www.InspiredbyIsabella.com

It’s About More Than Us…

05.08.13-Daily-Inspirational-Quotes-as-ifYesterday we were excited to see Isabella’s story on the front page of our local newspaper, the Nordonia News Leader. We’ve been blessed to have had our story shared via several media outlets over the past few weeks and are grateful for the many family and friends who’ve supported us as we move into our second year of life with type 1 diabetes.

However, no matter how much exposure our story gets, or how many times Isabella’s adorable face is featured in an article or website, the truth is that she is just one of hundreds of thousands of people affected by this disease.  JDRF estimates that the rate of T1D in children under 14 will continue to increase by 3% each year.  Though more and more children will continue to be diagnosed,  two things remain the same:

1) There is no defined cause and

2) There is no cure.

 

After our story ran in the newspaper yesterday I received the following message from a local mom:

“Hello, I just read your inspiring story about Isabella. Thank you for raising awareness about this condition. My son is also a type 1 diabetic. It’s amazing how far he has come with this over the years. When my son was first diagnosed there were 16 children in our district with this condition.We have come a long way since then. I know how you feel. I really do. I’m a single Mom so many days can be hard. I thought my son’s condition would limit him but I have been so wrong. Last year he was on the football team and in band. Your daughter is beautiful. I so hope and pray for a cure soon.Thank you for sharing your story. It really makes people also feel like they are not alone.”

And this, friends, is why we are doing what we are doing.

Cheers to Changing the World,
Kristina

Our Story and Glu!

Screen Shot 2013-08-27 at 9.51.48 PMWe received great news today that Glu, an online community for people with type 1 diabetes, posted an article about our family!  Not only that, it’s the feature story on their home page right now 🙂 What a wonderful way to celebrate the eve of Isabella’s 1-year Diaversary of being diagnosed with T1D.

Here’s a link to the Glu site so you can all check it out:

www.myglu.org

PS-Thanks to our very talented photographer friend Captured by Kelly Photography for taking the beautiful photos that accompany the article.