Why We All Need A Patty

Isa and Addison

Most people would look at this photo and see two little girls, happy and smiling…without a care in the world. What you’re really looking at are two AMAZING 3-year-olds fighting the challenges thrown at them by type 1 diabetes.

We had an awesome day with little Addison and her family today where we enjoyed pizza,  pump site changes (one planned and one not!), high (400) & low (48) blood sugars, and the beginning of an adorable friendship between two toddlers who’ve found a friend that “has didabeeeteees too!”

Watching Addison ask Isa if she wanted stickers to decorate her new insulin pod and holding her hand during her site change…and seeing Addison timidly show Isa her continuous glucose monitor adorning her little belly…it made me realize just how much it matters to have someone by your side who’s fighting the same battle as you. And I’m not just talking about the girls.

When Isabella was diagnosed we were in the hospital for less than 24 hours when we had a knock on our hospital room door.  In walked a woman that, though I didn’t realize it at the time, would set the scene for how I would be as a mother of a child with T1D.

Over the next hour this woman, Patty, told us about her life as a mom and wife to children AND a husband with Type 1.  She gave us a book of information about diabetes care she had photocopied from when one of her children was first diagnosed. She told us about diabetes camps and the difference they had made in her children’s lives.  She smiled. She laughed.  And her hair and makeup looked great.

She was normal.  

I wanted to be like Patty.

Before Christmas this past year a classmate of Isa’s was diagnosed with Type 1.  Up until that moment Isa had been the only child in her school with diabetes.  I didn’t know the family of this newly diagnosed child and had heard they would be moving and leaving the school over the holidays.  The day before the holiday break I went to the school to pick up the kids and, almost as if it was meant to be, the little boy’s father was there picking him up.  I am a firm believer in fate, and this was it.  It was my turn to be Patty.

I passed our contact info on to the dad and encouraged him to reach out to Greg or I if he or his wife needed anything. I told him about our experience with the OmniPod pump and about the Children with Diabetes Friends for Life Conference we attended in Orlando. I told him we were just a year post diagnosis so we were still learning, too, but that we could certainly provide advice based on our short experience. I was sure I’d return home that day to an email from this family with a list of questions I could answer. 

I was wrong. I was obviously no Patty.

Today while chatting with Addison’s mommy and daddy I was reminded of how important it is for parents of T1D kids to connect. To share stories of what’s worked and what hasn’t.  To commiserate about those unexplained lows and to curse the technology that, in reality, is helping us keep our children alive. To beam with pride when our kids exhibit bravery we could never muster.

We all need a Patty to remind us that our lives as our kid’s substitute pancreas won’t be easy, but to keep in mind that our kids will take their cues from us. It’s up to us to assure them that their diabetes, though a part of who they are, doesn’t define them. It’s up to us to let them know that there is an Addison somewhere out there to hold their hand.

So, for those of you who are newly diagnosed, or those who have just gotten the courage to seek out some support, we are here. I may not be a Patty but I can assure you that my hair and makeup look great, too.

Cheers to Changing the World,
Kristina

 

Comments

  1. Keep up the great work! We are all proud and INSPIRED by all of you!
    Sending love and hugs!

  2. darlene owen says:

    What a great story. You and Greg are fantastic with Isa and managing her diabetes. She will grow up to be a well adjusted teenager and with confidence to do anything she wants. We are so proud of all of you and love you.

  3. Kirsten Kuhns says:

    You were definitely my Patty when Isa first came to our school! I had been around T1D but never the actual substitute pancreas before. You and Isa walked through those doors (looking fabulous, of course!) and explained everything in such a way that it seemed like a casual thing to have T1D, and triplets! When you left that day I felt confident that having Isa in class would be a great addition, and so far those feelings have not changed!

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