Archives for October 2014

Here we go again…

I have always loved Halloween. I love dressing up and I love the excitement leading up to it. It’s probably no secret to those that know me well that I start planning costumes months in advance…and we don’t disappoint!For most kids, though, Halloween is about much more than choosing costumes.

It’s about the candy. C-A-N-D-Y.

Most people would expect that, as parents of a kid with type 1 diabetes, Halloween would be the holiday we dread the most.

And they would be right…but not for the reasons you would assume.

THIS is why I dread Halloween:

Halloween Diabetes
And this:
halloween diabetes 2
A year ago before Halloween I wrote a post in response to someone else’s blog entitled 10 Halloween Candy Alternatives That Won’t Give Your Kids Diabeetus. I realized then that there will always be people who choose to perpetuate stereotypes about this disease, simply because they don’t KNOW what it is. I also realized that there are people who back up jokes like these with the claim of “I was actually referring to TYPE 2 diabetes!”…as if that makes it ok. How about making a joke about cancer and saying “Oh! I didn’t mean breast cancer, I meant prostate cancer, silly!” Nope. Not ok. Another person’s illness or disease is not a joke…no matter what it’s called.This year I’ve decided that instead of being mad about these things, I’m going to channel my inner spirit fingers and let them help recharge my motivation (“Gimme a C-U-R-E!”). I know that our efforts to raise awareness and educate people about type 1 diabetes are helping someone…or many someones. I just know it.

I also know (ok, I just looked it up) that the word “ignorance” comes from the Latin ignorantia meaning “want of knowledge”. So you know what? We’re going to help the folks who continue to perpetuate the stereotypes about “diabeetus” (which, by the way, was only funny when it was said by Wilford Brimley) and keep supplying them with LOTS of knowledge.

You want it? You got it.
bees

Happy Halloween!

Bring it On…and Let’s Change the World~
Kristina

 

Defining a ‘Cure’

Isabella and Brynlee, T1D BFFs

Isabella and Brynlee – T1D BFFs

 

According to Webster’s, there are three definitions of the word “cure”:

1) Something (such as a drug or medical treatment) that stops a disease and makes someone healthy again

2) Something that ends a problem or improves a bad situation

3) The act of making someone healthy again after an illness

The definition that isn’t provided by Webster’s is the one you tell your four-year-old who is battling said disease/bad situation/illness.

But today I tried to define it.

Isabella has been overwhelmed with all of the hoopla over the past two months as we held fundraisers, ordered t-shirts with her likeness, and held special events in her honor. And it was great. No…it was amazing. To the tune of almost $15k in funds raised amazing.

For a cure.

A cure she didn’t know could exist.

Until today.

While brushing her hair this morning Isabella asked me the question I had been subconsciously dreading for the past two years: “What’s does ‘cure’ mean, mom?”

Bravery x 2

Bravery x 2 – Isabella and Addison

Isabella can read a facial expression like no other toddler I’ve met. I was grateful that she’d asked for double side ponies this morning instead of her usual side-swept style. I was behind her and she couldn’t see my face. She couldn’t see the wrinkle appear between my eyebrows, as is common when I’m caught off guard with a question I don’t know how to answer.

But she could tell by the delay in my response.

“Is a ‘cure’ for me, mom?”

I put the brush down and I moved in front of her so she could see me…so she could know that what I was going to say was the truth.

“Yes, it’s for you. A ‘cure’ would mean you wouldn’t have diabetes anymore.”

After a second or two she looked at me with the face of someone who’s just come to an amazing realization about something.

“And Addison and Brynlee? And Maeve and Lucas? Oh, and Miss Knox? And…”

As I listened to Isabella continue to name off, one-by-one, all of these young people living with type 1 whom she’s met since she began this journey just over two years ago, I realized that Webster’s got it wrong with their second definition of ‘cure’:

2) Something that ends a problem or improves a bad situation

 

Yes, a cure would end our journey with type 1 diabetes. And, yes, that is what we hope and pray for every day.

Isabella and Miss Knox!

Isabella and Miss Knox!

Where Webster’s gets it wrong is this: our lives have been made BETTER because of type 1 diabetes. Yes, BETTER. All of those people Isabella rattled off? They have made our lives BETTER. All of the challenges we’ve had making sure Isabella is safe at home and school each day has made us BETTER parents.

Does this mean we don’t need a cure for this disease? Of course not. What it does mean is that I wouldn’t change the path we have been on because, as a result, we have had the chance to make a difference. To educate people about this disease and the signs and symptoms to look out for as the numbers of kids diagnosed grows each year. To spread awareness about differences and help people understand that kids with challenges are regular kids.

As I slid the last Hello Kitty rubber band into Isabella’s hair I turned to look her in the eyes.

“Yes, Isa…the ‘cure’ will be for all of you. And the ‘cure’ will be BECAUSE of all of you.”

And it will.

Cheers to Changing the World~

Kristina